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Wednesday

Kids Learn & Do at VBS

How I live my life in my COMMUNITY can show others God’s great love for them. That’s the main theme of today’s teaching. Kids can make a difference by helping others.

Today's Teaching

Today’s lesson was all about food, farming, and the effect of Hurricane Matthew on Haiti’s southern peninsula.

We started out talking about the funny foods Haitians like for breakfast. Ask your kids what they are! But not all kids in Haiti get breakfast. Some kids only get one meal a day, and it’s served to them in school.

Southern Haiti, where the Glory Glory Center is located, is the “breadbasket” of Haiti. In fact, after the Earthquake in 2010, the south supplied much-needed food to Port-au-Prince. But when Hurricane Matthew swept across the peninsula, it destroyed 100% of crops and killed 80% of the animals in some areas, affecting all of Haiti food supply. The farmers have yet to recover.

Southern Haiti is tropical, much like Hawaii. There are lots of fruits, like mango, papaya, pineapple, coconut, plantains, and bananas. Most Haitians rely on rice or cornmeal and beans, which is sometimes served with vegetables. Meat is precious and rarely served; when it is, it is usually chicken, pork, or goat.

Thanks to disaster relief funds from Mariners Church, Pastor Samuel provided assistance to 16 neighboring towns following the storm. From October 2016 through April 2017, he distributed food to more than 6,000 families (many on multiple occasions) and gifted 114 families and 5 churches with building materials like sheet metal and wood.

 

The children at the Glory Glory Center get two hearty meals per day. Here, they're enjoying Haitian rice and [red] beans.

The children at the Glory Glory Center get two hearty meals per day. Here, they’re enjoying Haitian rice and [red] beans.

Mama Dibreis cooks for 65 people on two tiny hibachis. Another hibachi is located outside on the porch. Cooking oil is in the yellow container. Coal provides heat.

Mama Dibreis cooks for 65 people on two tiny hibachis. Another hibachi is located outside on the porch. Cooking oil is in the yellow container. Coal provides heat.

The southern peninsula of Haiti is lush, tropical farm land. The bulk of Haiti's food is grown here.

The southern peninsula of Haiti is lush, tropical farm land. The bulk of Haiti’s food is grown here.

Hurricane Matthew destroyed homes, crops, and livestock. Though it didn't take as many lives as the earthquake, it was equally devastating. It will take a decade for some crops to rebound.

Hurricane Matthew destroyed homes, crops, and livestock. Though it didn’t take as many lives as the earthquake, it was equally devastating. It will take a decade for some crops to rebound.

Following the hurricane, Pastor Samuel helped 16 communities with disaster relief funds donated by Mariners Church. He distributed food to 6,000+ families (multiple times) and provided building materials to 114 families and 5 churches.

Following the hurricane, Pastor Samuel helped 16 communities with disaster relief funds donated by Mariners Church. He distributed food to 6,000+ families (multiple times) and provided building materials to 114 families and 5 churches.

Today's Activity

Today, we did a blind taste test of foods commonly eaten in southern Haiti. We had students and leaders on stage, representing the red and blue teams. Be sure to ask your kids who identified the most foods…Grumpy Cat or Doug the Pug.

 

Mango, plantain, papaya, and pineapple all grow well in the fertile southern Haiti soil.

Mango, plantain, papaya, and pineapple all grow well in the fertile southern Haiti soil.

Farming in Haiti is hard work, and all family members help, including the children.

Farming in Haiti is hard work, and all family members help, including the children.

In Haiti, coconut water comes straight from the coconut!

In Haiti, coconut water comes straight from the coconut!

Today's Bible Verses

 

28 One of the teachers of religion who was standing there listening to the discussion realized that Jesus had answered well. So he asked, “Of all the commandments, which is the most important?”

29 Jesus replied, “The one that says, ‘Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is the one and only God. 30 And you must love him with all your heart and soul and mind and strength.’

31 “The second is: ‘You must love others as much as yourself.’ No other commandments are greater than these.”

Mark 12:28-31 (TLB) – The Great Commandment

Parents Learn & Do Too

Join us in Haiti on a Faith Adventure and meet Pastor Samuel and his Glory Glory family. See where we’re going to build a school. Experience, first-hand, the power of the global church.

Questions to Ask Your Kids

Main Program

1. What do Haitians eat?

2. How did Pastor Sam and his kids help others during the Hurricane?

3. How could you help others in need?

Kinder Program

1. What do Haitians eat?

2. What’s it like to be a farmer in Haiti?

3. How do children help their parents on the farm?

VBS Fundraising Goal

Our goal this year is to raise $25,000 to help build Sam’s school. We’ll be putting this money directly toward the construction of three (3) kindergarten classrooms and one (1) playground.

On our School page, you can read a summary of the project, as well as download a copy of the comprehensive Haiti School Strategic Plan and Haiti School Budget, which details exactly how much it will cost to build the school and operate it for one (1) year.

Cell Phone & Toiletries Collection

At Pastor Samuel’s request, we’re collecting gently used cell phones and toiletries this year to take to our friends in Haiti in August.

Cell Phones: Must be sim-card compatible. These phones will be distributed to people who lost their phones to the rain or tidal surge during Hurricane Matthew.

Toiletries: We’re requesting different toiletries from each of the grades at VBS so that we get an even mix of items. Please send only personal-sized items. We cannot transport family-sized or bulk items.

Kindergarten & Preschool – hair accessories (barrettes, headbands, ponytail holders, etc.)

1st Grade – bar soap & lotion

2nd Grade – toothbrush & toothpaste

3rd Grade – fine-toothed combs & picks (for african hair)

4th Grade – compact mirror (e.g. “clamshell” that folds and goes in your purse)

5th Grade – antiperspirant / deodorant (men & women)

DonateToiletries

Download Bookmark PDF

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