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Thursday

Kids Learn & Do at VBS

How I live my life at SCHOOL can show others God’s great love for them. That’s the main theme of today’s teaching. Kids have great influence over their peers.

Today's Teaching

Today, we’re talking about school. In Haiti, it’s not uncommon for children to walk miles to and from school each day, since very few people have cars.

Currently, Sam’s children attend two different schools. The oldest kids attend a private school in the town of Torbeck. Sam pays for them to jump in the back of a pick-up truck or on a motorbike so they don’t have to walk hours each way. The younger kids walk just ½ mile to attend a neighborhood school.

Education in Haiti is a privilege. In fact, 50% of children never attend school. Most schools are private (90%), run by churches and NPOs. Even a below average school may cost upwards of $150 per year per student, which is an almost impossible sum for families earning less that $2 per day. Those who attend school usually have their expenses paid by a family member living outside of Haiti.

Pastor Samuel intends to build a premier, private school that will educate 1,000 students per year (including his own kids). This school will provide 50+ jobs, offer skills training at night (trade school), and contribute to other development initiatives that will benefit the community at large. The curriculum will promote Christian values, develop Haiti’s future leaders, and encourage these leaders to stay in Haiti rather than emigrate to the USA, Britain, France, or Canada.

Postscript: Haiti receives $1.2B in remittances from immigrants in the United States. This accounts for 13.7954% of Haiti’s national GDP of $8.7B. The average migrant from Haiti remits $1.8K back annually. (http://labs.time.com/story/where-immigrants-send-the-most-money-home)

 

Sam's girls love to play to the camera! Here, you can see the girls' uniforms, which include large ribbons in their hair. For some kids, the spaghetti they're served in school is their only meal.

Sam’s girls love to play to the camera! Here, you can see the girls’ uniforms, which include large ribbons in their hair. For some kids, the spaghetti they’re served in school is their only meal.

This is the school most of Sam's kids attend. It's an good school in the rural community in which it's located. Because space is limited, some children go to class inside the church on the right.

This is the school most of Sam’s kids attend. It’s an good school in the rural community in which it’s located. Because space is limited, some children go to class inside the church on the right.

Only the youngest children speak Kreyol in class. Even though most Kreyol is most kids' primary language, classes are taught in French, which is the language of the educated in Haiti.

Only the youngest children speak Kreyol in class. Even though most Kreyol is most kids’ primary language, classes are taught in French, which is the language of the educated in Haiti.

This is the type of school that Pastor Samuel hopes to build. In May 2017, he purchased 7.5 acres of land. Now, our goal is to raise the money to build a perimeter wall and start construction on three (3) kindergarten classrooms and a playground.

This is the type of school that Pastor Samuel hopes to build. In May 2017, he purchased 7.5 acres of land. Now, our goal is to raise the money to build a perimeter wall and start construction on three (3) kindergarten classrooms and a playground.

Today's Activity

Outreach Jeopardy was the activity today. We reviewed some of the things we learned about Haiti, Pastor Samuel, and his kids in a fun, interactive way. Kids had the opportunity to display how much they remembered from the week’s lessons.

50 percent of Haiti’s children do not attend school. Approximately 30% of children attending primary school will not make it to third grade; 60% will abandon school before sixth grade. Only 29 percent of Haitians 25 and above attended secondary school.

Parents Learn & Do Too

We firmly believe a premier private school is the only long-term sustainability solution for the Glory Glory Center. Learn why by clicking above.

Questions to Ask Your Kids

1. Do all Haitian kids go to school? If they do go, how do they get there?

2. Why do you think it’s important for Haitian kids to go to school?

3. How do you think building a new school will help Haiti?

VBS Fundraising Goal

Our goal this year is to raise $25,000 to help build Sam’s school. We’ll be putting this money directly toward the construction of three (3) kindergarten classrooms and one (1) playground.

On our School page, you can read a summary of the project, as well as download a copy of the comprehensive Haiti School Strategic Plan and Haiti School Budget, which details exactly how much it will cost to build the school and operate it for one (1) year.

Cell Phone & Toiletries Collection

At Pastor Samuel’s request, we’re collecting gently used cell phones and toiletries this year to take to our friends in Haiti in August.

Cell Phones: Must be sim-card compatible. These phones will be distributed to people who lost their phones to the rain or tidal surge during Hurricane Matthew.

Toiletries: We’re requesting different toiletries from each of the grades at VBS so that we get an even mix of items. Please send only personal-sized items. We cannot transport family-sized or bulk items.

Kindergarten & Preschool – hair accessories (barrettes, headbands, ponytail holders, etc.)

1st Grade – bar soap & lotion

2nd Grade – toothbrush & toothpaste

3rd Grade – fine-toothed combs & picks (for african hair)

4th Grade – compact mirror (e.g. “clamshell” that folds and goes in your purse)

5th Grade – antiperspirant / deodorant (men & women)

DonateToiletries

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